Inhale…exhale 🌿

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Inhale…exhale 🌿

I have had always had digestive problems for as long as I can remember and I feel I have tried every possible thing to remain ‘regular’, less bloated, less groggy and all around happy. From detox teas to senna teas to Plum juices to yougart and probiotic pills…you name it I bet I’ve tried it all.

Over the summer, as I worked out more so than in the fall and winter months, I began really started looking into holistic healthcare and focus more on my mental health. I was that friend or family member who kept a pill container of vitamins, in odds and ends in my purse, glove box, desk drawer & of course in any medicine cabinet in the house. I just never knew when I’d have to grab an ibprofin, aspirin, Imodium, Tums, or Pepto. I had become…the pill queen 👑…and wore my little crown proudly. Whenever anyone was in need…whether it was cramps, migraine, slight headache, inflammation, indigestion…I had it ready and was ‘Jill ( not Johnny)on the spot’.

It wasn’t until I really delved into mental and holistic healthcare a little more until I later realized a few things that I should have known.

1. Pain is natural…suck it up buttercup !

2. Everything does not require a pill…a glass of wine (dare I even say such a thing), or…coffee (I may regret saying this, but we’ll go with it for now).

3. Water, water, water ! According to my go to source WebMd; Drinking water helps maintain the balance of body fluids. Your body is composed of about 60% water. The functions of these bodily fluids include digestion, absorption, circulation, creation of saliva, transportation of nutrients, and maintenance of body temperature.

Water helps your kidneys. Body fluids transport waste products in and out of cells. The main toxin in the body is blood urea nitrogen, a water-soluble waste that is able to pass through the kidneys to be excreted in the urine.

Water helps maintain normal bowel function. Adequate hydration keeps things flowing along your gastrointestinal tract and prevents constipation. When you don’t get enough fluid, the colon pulls water from stools to maintain hydration — and the result is constipation.

While these are all things I’ll admit I should have known sometimes everyone has their epiphany, their lightbulb or their ‘Ah ha !’ moment at a later time.

I can say now that while I still use pills I am not nearly as dependent as I have now sought natural methods of healing, I have introduced meditation, breathing & stretching exercises. I ultimately came to the conclusion I was having so many digestive problems due to stress. I am slowly learning to ‘Inhale the good shit & exhale the bullshit’. Now, don’t get me wrong I will still have a cheat day, a Girl’s Night In or Out (now with Skinny margaritas to cut cals), and I’ve limited coffee intake to try and ‘stay sane’. I’m just a lot more contious of what I out in my body & it so much more than caloric intake…it’s how many meals have I had, where’s my water and what was the last time I ate. I am trying to be a lot more aware of my little machine & I know it’ll only work as well as I want it to with the proper nutrition (fuel), nourishment, sufficient water & ultimately rest.

In the vein of digestive health, I’ve also begun to occasionally drink Kombucha tea. I stumbled upon it while visiting a local market and read the contents. I figured it wouldn’t hurt so as I put it in my basket I got on my ‘Google machine’ and began my research. 

 Kombucha refers to any of a variety of fermented, lightly effervescent sweetened black or green tea drinks that are commonly used as functional beverages for their unsubstantiated health benefits. Kombucha is produced by fermenting tea using a “symbiotic ‘colony’ of bacteria and yeast” (SCOBY). Actual contributing microbial populations in SCOBY cultures vary, but the yeast component generally includes Saccharomyces (a probiotic fungus) and other species, and the bacterial component almost always includes Gluconacetobacter xylinus to oxidize yeast-produced alcohols to acetic and other acids.

Kombucha refers to any of a variety of fermented, lightly effervescent sweetened black or green tea drinks that are commonly used as functional beverages for their unsubstantiated health benefits. Kombucha is produced by fermenting tea using a “symbiotic ‘colony’ of bacteria and yeast” (SCOBY). Actual contributing microbial populations in SCOBY cultures vary, but the yeast component generally includes Saccharomyces (a probiotic fungus) and other species, and the bacterial component almost always includes Gluconacetobacter xylinus to oxidize yeast-produced alcohols to acetic and other acids.

                                                  
The geographic origin of kombucha is unknown, and its etymology is uncertain. Historically, kombucha has been home-brewed or locally brewed, but in the late 1990s, commercially bottled kombucha became available in North American retail stores. It is known in Chinese as chájūn (茶菌), Japanese as kōcha-kinoko (紅茶キノコ), Korean as hongchabeoseotcha (홍차버섯차) and Russian as chaynyy grib (чайный гриб). These names translate literally to “tea fungus” or “tea mushroom.”

Kombucha has been claimed to cure many diseases and to have a wide range of health benefits; however, there is a lack of high-quality evidence to support these claims. There are several documented cases of adverse effects related to kombucha drinking, and there is the potential for contamination during home preparation. A systematic review found that the mostly unclear benefits of kombucha drinking did not outweigh the known risks, thus could not be recommended for therapeutic use.

Kombucha has been promoted with claims that it can treat a wide variety of human illnesses including AIDS, cancer, and diabetes, and that it provides other beneficial effects such as stimulation of the immune system, boosting the libido, and reversal of gray hair. However, evidence of kombucha’s beneficial effects in humans is lacking. In particular, although animal and in vitro experiments suggest that kombucha consumption may be beneficial, as of 2014 no controlled human trials have been conducted to confirm these conclusions.

While his post was a little different than most please note as the holidays come I will still serve up the meals you have so grown to love but I want to add a healthier twist.
Be Happy, Be Healthy ✌🏾

#JayTheFoodie

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